The world’s rarest birds, 300 of which are now extinct, return 50 years later.

The animals here are very different from those in other places. Before many alien species settled in New Zealand, there was only one native mammal bat in the country. New Zealand’s birds are basically not able to fly, such as penguins, exotic birds, South Yangji. South Yangji was once thought to be extinct, but they were discovered 50 years later.

The rarest bird in the world

Nanyangji, also known as giant water chicken, is about 63 cm long and weighs about 3 kg. It has a hard beak and strong legs and can’t fly. It is distributed in Australia and New Zealand. They were confirmed to be extinct in 1898, but they were rediscovered on New Zealand’s South Island in 1948. In paleontology, this phenomenon is called “Lazarus species”, that is, a species is identified as extinct and found again.

Before humans landed on New Zealand island and brought cats, dogs, foxes, etc., New Zealand’s predators had always been hawks. The strategy of not flying and hiding in the trees was more conducive to the birds escaping from the eagle’s claws. Therefore, some birds on the island evolved in the direction of not flying, and many birds degenerated their flight ability. Nanyangji is no exception, but its feet are very strong. Although it does not have webbed feet, it can swim and dive. When it is threatened, it will choose “diving” to protect its life.

The rarest bird in the world

In 2015, the New Zealand government sent professional hunters to kill a large number of purple grouse (purple grouse is also a kind of Yangji, whose body feathers are mostly named purple or blue), which will destroy other nests and eat birds’ eggs. But the hunter actually “points the wrong phase”, mistook four endangered Southern Yangji for purple water chicken shooting. Local media said: the death of four southern Yangji reduced its number by 5%, which is equivalent to the loss of 160 tigers or 93 giant pandas.

The rarest bird in the world

At present, New Zealand has designated a reserve of nearly 50000 hectares for South Yangji, and the existing number of South Yangji is about 300 (70-80 in the wild). Although there is no need to worry about poachers’ capture, ferrets and wild cats have become the biggest enemies of giant water chickens. However, whether new Zealanders are bored in the scientific nature of species conservation or in the natural recovery has been leading in the world, which is worth learning from.